Importance of Auto Care Coupons

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Auto care coupons are so important as they help in saving on auto care services. Your vehicle is so important to you and thus it needs to keep running stronger, newer and longer. However, this is possible only when it is in good condition. These coupons help you fit into automotive budget.

The coupon maybe used in the following services: synthetic oil change, conventional oil change, summer car care. A/C performance check, brake service, air conditioning service, computerized alignment, preventive maintance, fluid services, tires rebates and many more. Car owners should take advantage of this promotional way to have the best services for peak performance.

The car maintance coupons are available for areas within your locality. Car maintenance is important as it keeps your vehicle on the road. At times, the maintenance cost may be so high for your budget, however finding a coupon saves you a lot.

Drivers should look out for these coupons on the internet and by signing on alerts and newsletters from the auto care companies in their areas. These deals are so good most companies offering coupons are accredited and have certified technicians. Therefore, expect a high quality auto care service by simply printing the coupon and taking it to the service provider. On the other hand, the code is entered on the site to confirm the offer. In addition, some stores just need you to show the coupon on your Smartphone, thanks to the technology.

In most cases, the coupon is not used with other offers such as rebates and discounts. Always confirm with the nearest store location to avoid online fraud. The coupon should be used within a given time before the offer expires. There are also terms and conditions that apply and should well understood. After getting the coupon, make an appointment to the auto care centre for the service.

The latest coupons for car maitenance you can find online: www.carservicecoupon.com

The Tire coupons dealers

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Some online websites that offer tire coupons normally offers discount or promotions that enables fair deals to their clients. The companies such as Cooper Tire Reward ending offers visa cards upon purchases of their products. The Coupon Grabber company also offers free both locally and online services to the retailers Their coupon list deal is oftenly updated to enable their clients have the maximum variety of choice. The companies such as BFGoodrich offer tires of great quality. They offer them at a discount price and can be accessed online via their website link address, www.bfgoodrichtires.com. They offer promotions such as winning of master cards to those who buy four or more of their BFGood rich tires. They have both local and online dealers which can be found in their websites. The BFGoodrich offers other more special tire coupons. This includes Goodyear,continental,yokohama,dunlop and perelli. Their purchase are limited to only dealer-installed retailers.Bef ore their services are rendered,complete purchases should be made on FSCC (Ford Service Credit Cards). Each and every tire above have varying special rebate offers ranging from about $50 to $80. The coupon offers are valid from 7/1/14 to 8/31/14 or any other specified date. The participating dealership for auto-motives applications cannot be incorporated with any other tire manufacturer. The participants accounts details must be clearly defined and for PereIli tires, one must purchase four using a FSCC in order to qualify for the $130 rebate.

Thus, for one to participate in a coupon tire deals, he/she must be a vehicle owner with clear ownership details. For validation of dealer installed purchases,one require current competitor’s price offer on specific tire sold by the dealership. This normally takes place in a period of 30 days after sells. They have scheduled times times for services thus one can find out depending on the location he/she is found. They also offer search tools for various tires and therefore one can look for a specific one using the tire name. You can find all latest coupons and rebates for tires at www.carservicecoupon.com

Moving out of state top tips review

Moving out of state can be quite hectic. This is especially true if, money is tight and you are looking to save as much of it as possible. Since it is in your best interest to keep your cross-country costs as low as possible, you need to make an effort to get the cheapest moving services possible.

Keep Your Property to the Bare Minimum

The more things that you have to move, the more money you will have to pay. You should therefore ensure that you keep things to the bare minimum. Unless the things you possess have some significant meaning to you, you may want to toss them in the trash, donate them, or put them up for sale.

If you do not have attachment to some of your stuff and are looking to replace them, then selling them will be a good idea. You will be able to generate additional cash with which to buy better replacements at your new home. Donating some of the things you do not need, not only reduces the amount of stuff you will need to move, but also helps someone else who needs them more.

Also, take time to package everything that you will be moving with. It will give you an idea of how much property you actually have. Find free boxes to pack your stuff in. Why should you have to pay for something that someone else will want to get rid of?

Select the Best Moving Option

Moving out of state can be done in many ways. It all depends on how much stuff you will be moving to your destination. A truck is usually one of the best options to use for a large amount of things. You can also opt for airfreight services. Shipping services also come in handy when you are looking for the cheapest way to move. The moving option that you select, should offer you the most convenience for the lowest amount of money possible. Do bear in mind though, the security of your stuff during the moving process. There is no use selecting an option that will end up making you lose some of your property. The money you will have to spend to replace your things, will make any savings you were looking to make worthless.

You can go along with your either stuff or independent of it. If you have sold and given away almost everything that you own, consider getting on a train with your remaining items. The ticket may be cheaper. You can also consider getting on a plane if you have very little baggage in the first place. It all depends on the weight limits placed on train or plane luggage.

Do It Yourself

Have you considered moving your stuff on your own? You can rent a truck from out of state moving companies and drive yourself to your destination. You can then drop off the truck at the company offices. While transporting your stuff is hard work, you will be saving plenty of money by taking the burden of moving upon your shoulders. Many cheap moving companies offer this option, which is quite popular with people who want to save money. Take advantage of it.

Call In a Favor

Being able to call in a favor to have your stuff moved for you may end up being cheaper than going through the normal rental channels. You can call in a favor from a friend who owns a truck, have the truck fueled, and drive it to your destination. Alternatively, you can arrange for someone to drive it there and then back. Before you use this option, analyze the pros and cons to see if the money savings are worth it.

Shop Around

If you have no idea of how to move out of state, then take time to familiarize yourself with the options that exist out there. Shop around, do price comparison, and analyze the discount offers available to you. Make those moving companies fight for your business, and do not be afraid to negotiate.

By shopping around, you raise the chances of finding the cheapest moving out of state services possible. In addition, you will be able to lower the moving costs further by taking advantage of the low-demand days to rent a truck or trailer in that period.

Plan

Plan everything well if you want to move out of state cheaply. Arrange for the best moving options, select the best routes and accommodation points along the way, and look for discount offers in advance. When you plan well, moving out of state can be a very fun and cheap way to start a new life! See this video about moving out of state.

The City and The City by China Miéville

As a popular novel by a popular author it seems a little obsolete to review China Miéville’s The City and The City. Indeed, what struck me as someone who writes critically on ideas of place, is also one of the most foregrounded aspects of the novel – the relationship between the two cities. Yet I was further struck by how, to make this a realistic depiction of the urban environment, Miéville must include in his divided setting the human and the non-human, the built and the elements, and how both the controlled and the uncontrolled pass through the borders (physical and psychological) as a symbol of the inevitable chaos within order.

 

In terms of genre Miéville’s novel is ostensibly a detective novel, however the setting of two cities that share the same space but remain, and are determined to remain, separate, gives most of the plot its twists and turns, as well as its shape as a symbolic space. Unlike, say, The Lord of the Rings in which the setting may be a perfect symbol of a civilisation or a moral comment, Miéville allows his city to be populated by the imperfect, the chaotic, as well as the representative.

 

In one scene, the protagonist Tyador Borlú, sitting in his apartment comments “I always wanted to live where I could watch foreign trains” (p.49). Within the cities, it is overtly forbidden to “see” things that are actually in the other city, even if they might be spatially adjacent. As such Miéville’s novel demonstrates the divide between space and place where space is what is physically present and place is humanly-created (1). The space may be the same for the two cities, but the place is overtly other. While Borlú’s actions demonstrate that a certain level of deliberate disobedience is allowed, even if not officially acknowledged, for the majority of the book the human characters obey these strict differences between space and place.

 

The weather, however, does not obey the borders between space and place. Fog, wood smoke, and rain are said to drift across both cities (p.66) and in terms of general weather the characters within the novel tend to treat it as either an old joke (it rains more in one city) or as a symbol of unification (the cities do get the same weather – an acknowledgement that even as they do not share place they do share space). The resident animals are more of an issue as they cross the place boundaries at will and can cause confusion. In this sense Miéville can be seen to draw a sketchy line between vaguely ‘human’ and ‘non-human’ elements.

 

However, two categories appear to question this division. Domestic animals also do not obey the space and place distinctions, and most interestingly of all, neither does rubbish. As a humanly-created waste product the issue of rubbish is an intriguing one as it drifts across the borders and mixes at will. Borlú notes that it is often not certain which city it is in, particularly when the writing fades (p.80). As such the strict categories break down, and even with such control between the cities as the independent mysterious force of Breach, crossings and co-mingling do occur.

 

As a novel so concerned with humanly-created and enforced borders The City and The City, whether read allegorically or as an intricate exercise in contemporary urban world creation, cleverly demonstrates how even ridged borders are not impenetrable and, in a sense, only work because of this inherent chaos. After all, such borders would be obsolete if everything and everyone did obey them in every instance. Rather, Miéville examines how people can, almost illogically; create such an arbitrary distinction between space and place, and how it is the chaos within such an order that, in fact, keeps things together.

Adventure Time with Fionna and Cake: Issue 1

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The comic Adventure Time with Fionna and Cake is a spin-off from the Fionna and Cake episode of cartoon series Adventure Time, in which our brave adventurers and the entirety of the cast’s genders are flipped. Adventure Time features the human boy Finn, and his magical dog friend Jake and their adventures.

 

Adventure Time with Fionna and Cake features the adventures of Fionna the human girl and her magical feline female companion Cake, and is the first issue in a six part mini-series written and Illustrated by Natasha Allegri, with lettering by Britt Wilson and including the short Fionna and Cake feature The Sweater Bandit written and illustrated by Noelle Stevenson. While I love Adventure Time usually, I love the Fionna and Cake spin-off even more, and was delighted by the news that it would be expanded out into a comic mini-series.

 

The thing I love about Adventure Time and this spin-off, is it’s light-hearted fantasy which is totally unselfconscious about being fantastical – there are candy people, hot dog knights, and unicorns made of rainbows. It’s not trying to be pious like high fantasy, or gritty and “real” like urban fantasy, it’s fun for all ages, and looks like it could be a children’s cartoon, but pay attention for a little while and you’ll find profoundness in the stories, and some fairly classic science fiction and fantasy storylines – the stories sometimes remind me quite a bit of Doctor Who, actually. Except without most of the nightmare fuel like Daleks, Cybermen and Weeping Angels (remember as you’re going to sleep tonight – don’t blink!).

 

I haven’t read comics since I was a teenager, because I was ultimately frustrated by the representation as women – as flat, generically “sexy” female characters superficially strong but consistently posed to look “sexy” rather than any other way a woman might be; “fierce”, “angry”, “grim”, or anything else under the sun. It was offensive to me as a woman to not see broader roles for women in comics, an offensive to me as a reader to see such consistently weak storytelling of female characters.

 

For a good discussion about the multiple issues with sexism in comics, I suggest reading Laura Hudson’s article The Big Sexy Problem with Superheroines and Their ‘Liberated Sexuality’, or her article Female Super-Hero Characters and Sex: Creators Explain How Comics Can Do Better interviewing a panel of comics creators investigating the same issue from multiple perspectives. My take on the matter can be summed up by Kurt Busiek’s comment:

“My argument, over and over, is that ‘sexy’ isn’t the problem. Sameness is the problem. Don’t make all women look the same. Don’t make them act the same. Give us a range of portrayals, like the men… Now, they’re all Victoria’s Secret models, cocking their hips, arching their backs, pursing their lips and teasing their hair. I saw a team shot recently that looked like a varied bunch of male heroes and three clones of the same woman, just in different costumes. Women should be varied. They should look different, think different, act different, talk different… Just as surely as the men, because they’re all individuals and we want the characters we read about to be distinctive and memorable.”

 

And that’s what had driven me away from comics, but Fionna and Cake drew me back in. Because here you have a story, with an epic friendship between two female leads based on their interests in adventuring, discovering new things, and being heroes. These aren’t strong female characters who only get time in the story when it’s in relation to the male characters; their stories aren’t about them posing sexily, but about the adventures they have. It’s a light-hearted comic with female characters and real storytelling, about heroic women, the friendship between them, rescuing princes and fighting the fierce Ice Queen.

 

If you’re interested in reading a comic with adventure and awesome women being awesome Adventure Time with Fionna and Cake: Issue 1 may be exactly what you’re looking for.

 

Excerpt:

Excerpt

Red Country by Joe Abercrombie

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red-country-by-joe-abercrombieRed Country has been described as Abercrombie’s interpretation of fantasy meets western: the harshness of the setting, turbulence of the characters’ lives and interactions all work to present an exceptionally dark story. High fantasy with western elements, adventure, warfare and regular tips to his previous books, “Red Country” is firmly set in Abercrombie’s own universe, despite its genre subversions, and needs to be approached in sequential order, rather than as a stand-alone piece, although its blurb may suggest otherwise.

The text is ostensibly a travel narrative prone to frequent violent outbursts, including the ear-severing murderousness of “the Ghosts”, kidnappers, general amorality, selfishness and greed of the main cast.  Previously encountered characters are paraded out, only to be jettisoned back and picked up again later, keeping the reader constantly on the look-out for familiar faces. This approach works rather well for “Red Country”, which occasionally threatens monotony with its initial travel focus, and keeps the reader guessing (although some characters’ disguises are very easy to anticipate).

Black humour and banter between the characters breaks up the atmosphere, keeps the story moving along, and gives out clues where the reader can next find a familiar character. This kind of “treasure hunting” adds another level to the travel narrative. The descriptions of the seedy towns, gore on the battlefields and fear experienced while travelling through the forests are wonderfully conveyed, as per usual, and the dialogue between characters is well maintained. Even with all its flaws, this is still a book that demands to be read, even where scenes begin to drag.

However, some of its flaws are concerning. Women just don’t get a good run in Abercrombie’s stories (just ask the lesbian queen in another book sentenced to reproduction for fear of her lover being killed – not a pleasant character, certainly, but this punishment made me feel particularly antagonised). “Red Country” is another such instalment. Despite attempts at creating “strong female characters”, none in Abercrombie’s books have really hit the mark quite yet. Shy’s actual development is slow to start with, and she suffers through long periods of text with simply being a very dull character in comparison to the better fleshed-out men. She is simply not very engaging, at least, not until the story goes over the halfway mark, and even that is limited. Her compassion for her kidnapped siblings is overshadowed by Lamb’s overarching compassion for her as his charge, and her deference to him is marred by suspicion. Temple’s sardonic plight, and the clamourings of countless other, more interesting male characters only highlight her relatively dull characterisation. The only other women mentioned are whores (barely mentioned at that), and a young girl who is yet another victim of the kidnappers (and who takes on a nurturing role for the other kidnapped children). Hardly the most refreshing depictions of women in fantasy, but better than nothing, which is what the characters come dangerously close to in many scenes. The Mayor is a more promising character, but there are still no Bechdel test passes here.

However, if you are a fan of medium-high fantasy and are looking for something that bends genres and is generally very enjoyable, then this is a book that I would recommend with only a small disclaimer. Abercrombie’s expression is crisp and very readable, his characters easy to visualise, and his stories accessible, if briefly frustrating in places.

 

Excerpt:

‘A man must follow the opportunities.’ He turned to take in the plot with an airy wave. ‘I am contracted to build upon this unrivalled site a residence and place of business for the firm of Majud and Curnsbick.’

‘My congratulations on leaving the legal profession and becoming a respectable member of the community.’

‘Do they have such a thing in Crease?’

‘Not yet, but I reckon it’s on the way. You stick a bunch of drunken murderers together, ain’t long before some turn to thieving, then to lying, then to bad language, and pretty soon to sobriety, raising families and making an honest living.’

‘It’s a slippery slope, all right.’

White is For Witching by Helen Oyeyemi

white-is-for-witching-by-helen-oyeyemi‘Sade, I want to ask you something,’ I said. ‘If you say yes, I’ll believe you. Just tell me. There’s something wrong with this house, isn’t there,’ I said.

            ‘It is a monster,’ Sade said, simply. (p.212)

 

More of a gothic tale than strict fantasy, White is For Witching is a contemporary novel with hints of a homage to Wuthering Heights, but not so extensive it becomes overpowering or the plot over-determined. Rather, Oyeyemi’s novel utilises multiple narrators, the uncanny and shifting narrative structures to tell the story of the Silver family coming to terms with the loss of Lily and the strange echoes of other, long dead (or possibly not) family members in the ancestral house.

 

The fragmented style of the book may be difficult for some readers, but it heightens the sense of uncertainly in the novel as the reader is never sure who will take up the narration next, and what their version of events might hold. The book begins with Ore, Eliot and ‘29 barton road’ narrating the first chapter in a very personal, broken way:

eliot: 

… What I mean is, each act of speech stands on the belief that someone will hear. My note to Miri says more than just I’m lonely. Invisibly it says that I know she will see this, and that when she sees this it will turn her back, return her.

Miri I conjure you

29:

She has wronged

me I will not allow her to live

 

try a different way:

 

what happened to lily silver?

(p.4)

 

Having the house as a narrator adds an interesting dimension to the story. While it could easily become an imaginative stretch too far, the hinted similarities to the houses in Wuthering Heights and the pervading sense of the dream-like and the unreal makes this, with some very accomplished writing, actually a very strong part of the novel.

 

Apart from the character of the active house, the magic in the novel deals with the idea of the soucouyant, or a witch-vampire from Caribbean folklore. Even as the origins of the story of the soucouyant are acknowledged, rather than portraying this as an exotic outsider, Oyeyemi allows the figure of the soucouyant to penetrate everyday life as a full and powerful figure. Further, instead of employing the typical Dracula-type plot regarding the return of the ‘monster’ to ‘whence it came’ (be that hell, another country, or even another state of mind) the plot in White is For Witching uses the figure of the soucouyant in a much more nuanced way. In this novel the suggestion is the power (be that monstrous or not) it comes from inside, rather than outside, and that it is a figure that is part of the very other of the self. In this way she manages to avoid exoticising such a myth and creates a very contemporary engagement with ideas of inheritance, choice and the unknowable.

 

To deviate slightly from the magical elements of the book, White is for Witching also features a relationship that develops between two of the female characters. Oyeyemi allows the love between the two characters to feature as essential  and emphasises the  connection it creates between the two characters as a statement of their bond. The relationship is presented as a natural and vital aspect of the story and Oyeyemi chooses not to foreground the differences, or similarities, between this relationship and others in the novel.

 

This is not a simple novel, and would certainly benefit from being read several times. What struck me most of all was how well it was written – Oyeyemei is an ambitious novelist in terms of the story she wants to tell, and how she wants to tell it. Yet, she manages to pull this off with and create a twisted, delving narrative which manages to cross the boundaries of the realist coming-of-age novel to include mythology, the gothic and the fantastic to explore the complexities of family history, inheritance and the realms of the possible.

 

Trigger warnings: self harm, suicide, character death.

 

White is For Witching is available in Paperback format for $11.47 AUD / $11.41 USD from The Book Depository.

Pride and Prejudice and Zombies by Jane Austen and Seth Grahame-Smith

pride-and-prejudice-and-zombies-by-jane-austen-and-seth-grahame-smith

I like zombies and I like Austen. I like parodies. So why didn’t I like Pride and Prejudice and Zombies?

I have heard that you either love Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, or you love the original Pride and Prejudice. I disagree. Both have their high and low points, and ultimately, Seth Grahame-Smith had a great concept, but just didn’t push it far enough.

 

Gimmicky and a bit forced at times, this is definitely not a book for a hardcore Austen fan. The imposition of the zombie narrative reads like a cheap laugh. This is a shame, because the book has some genuinely hilarious one-liners and brilliant dark humour. If you are interested in broadening your horizons in terms of zombie literature and parodies, then this may be the book for you. There is so much potential to this plot that its unconvincing delivery is a real disappointment. I would recommend reading the first couple of chapters anyway, just to see what all the fuss is about, but the rest of the book is gutted by its lacklustre approach to the plot.  Ultimately, Pride and Prejudice and Zombies reads like a great first draft in need of further structural revision.

 

Seth Grahame-Smith pays strict homage to Austen’s book for the most part in terms of delivery, and this is the main problem. The characters supplement in other, more contextually “natural” words such as “the dreadfuls” and “the unmentionables”, but it would have made the narrative flow much better had the word “zombie” been omitted entirely. The sense of context is disjointed and constantly brings to mind the author, rather than the story. The title would then have stood alone as a marker for what would follow. This is a book where a little would have gone a long way, but subtlety isn’t necessarily what you’re after if you’re reading a book about zombies and Victorian values. There are plenty of gory fight scenes for enthusiasts whose interests are neglected by Austen, but unfortunately the book is essentially an action-adventure comedic run that’s quick to cash in on zombie mania, rather than a well-planned piece of writing.

 

It is tempting to assert that Pride and Prejudice and Zombies is a more feminist take on Austen’s setting. The Bennett sisters are proficient in “the deadly arts”, due to their ninja training, therefore are able to take care of themselves, unlike countless others in the setting. They are more outspoken in general, and pride themselves on their independence. However, their access to these skills is not readily accounted for in the text, rendering their skills as unbelievable as their zombie foes. They are unlikely figures in an even more unlikely setting, destroying any semblance of empowerment that such a construction could have suggested. However, Seth Grahame-Smith’s effort on this part should be still recognised and commended. What needs to happen next is for this construction to be completed in another book.

 

This is a book that could have been amazing, but is hamstrung by its own adherence to Austen’s narrative style. It would have been possible, and potentially very compelling, to encode a zombie-fighting element to Pride and Prejudice, but it would have required perhaps an more confessional delivery style. Something more appropriate as a response to the travesties taking place, or at the very least, more in keeping with a disaster narrative written in the same time period. Austen’s writing style keeps the reader at an arm’s length, and this just doesn’t fit in a zombie and ninja-filled background. Ironically, Seth Grahame-Smith just doesn’t take enough liberties with the plot and structure to make this book compelling, or even readable in places. I’m still waiting for the ultimate zombies-meet-Victorian-values-and-train-with-ninjas book…

 

Excerpt:

“He begged to know to which of his fair cousins the excellency of its cookery was owing. Briefly forgetting her manners, Mary grabbed her fork and leapt from her chair onto the table. Lydia, who was seated nearest her, grabbed her ankle before she could dive at Mr. Collins and, presumably, stab him about the head and neck for such an insult.”

 

Pride and Prejudice and Zombies is available for AUD$8.35/USD$831 from the Book Depository

Bloodlines by Richelle Mead

Bloodlines is the first in a series of books by Richelle Mead, in the previously established setting of her series Vampire Academy, which I haven’t read. The story focuses on Sydney Sage, an alchemist sent undercover at a private high-school to protect a vampire princess. Alchemists strive to maintain separation between vampire and human races, having become keepers of their knowledge at some point in their science and magic meddling pasts.

 

This is a book that could really run awry with all its tropes, but what I really enjoyed about Bloodlines is that in some ways it’s reminiscent of Buffy The Vampire Slayer. Not in the presence of Big Bads (there are few mentions of the vampire race of the comparable category to those appearing in Buffy), but in the character friendships, especially between female, and male and female characters, which is fairly rare in vampire stories, where the female protagonist typically immediately swoons for the handsome and ever pale male vampire, to the exclusion of other social relationships.

 

This book is pretty much swoon-free, for all that there’s plenty of tension to the plot, there’s no steamy kiss between humans and vampires happening. Sydney might eventually wind up with Adrian later in the series, but she’s definitely not going to be interested in him anytime soon because:

•      She doesn’t get into relationships with vampires.
•      She doesn’t get into relationships with vampires.
•      Especially not Adrian, for fucks sake Adrian get your shit together.

The great thing about Adrian as a character, is that he’s not the kind of overly aggressive male protagonist I’ve read about in nearly every urban fantasy narrative. His problem is that he’s a directionless dandy, though he is at times also charming and relatable.

 

What ensues are some pretty interesting character developments and dynamics. Relationships between the alchemical and vampiric communities are terse. Vampires view the arrangement with alchemists as a beneficial symbiotic relationship, but for alchemists the compulsion to keep vampires separate and hidden from humans has a quasi-religious fervour to it. For previously demonstrating an ability to put aside alchemist ideology to work with vampires, Sydney is in a precarious situation; if her performance doesn’t meet the conservative alchemist’s approval, she’ll be sent for re-education (a nightmarish scenario in which she’d be turned into an obedient automaton), or her younger sister will be drafted into service as an alchemist in her place. As being an alchemist is a lifetime service where individual choice is undeniable; a fact that weighs heavily on Sydney, it’s not the life she wants for her sister.

 

Sydney at times toes the line of being a Mary Sue. She’s good at everything, virginal, and totally clueless about others being attracted to her. But her situation and stress reactions to it stop her from becoming a Mary Sue: she’s terrified and intolerant of magic, possibly has a borderline eating disorder, and has a tendency to fuck up social situations. Her position of trying to maintain the ideology of the alchemists, while at the same time being a logical person living alongside vampires and seeing them as something other than abominations is easy to sympathise with. Trope filled as she is, she’s a relatable female protagonist, and proof that with a good writer, tropes can make for a compelling narrative.

 

With Bloodlines, my enjoyment was somewhat slow to begin, given the time it took to immerse the necessary terminology from the info drops (three races of vampires, and a bunch of different vampires whose race is important to remember to understand their dynamics and abilities); but after that I was solidly immersed and this book succeeded in keeping me up at night.

 

If this review is somewhat hasty, it’s because I’m eager to crack open the next book in the series.